Jayam Ravi's Bhoomi is the latest film to come out on an OTT platform, during the Covid times and it happens to be Ravi's 25th film. Marking the festive occasion of Pongal, this Jayam Ravi starrer is out now on the Disney+ Hotstar streaming platform. This film is directed by Lakshman, who has already made Romeo Juliet and Bogan with Ravi. 

Bhoomi, as already seen in the trailer, traces the journey of Bhoominathan (Jayam Ravi), a NASA scientist turned farmer, who takes on a Billionaire, the CEO of several Multinational Companies, in order to save his farmers and agricultural lands. Does Bhoominathan manage to defeat the corporate bigwigs and succeed in his mission to develop the country's economy, forms the premise.

Bhoomi is the umpteenth film to take up the topic of farmers’ issues and agriculture and right at that place itself, the makers are posed with the challenge to deliver an impactful film. However, we do not get that. Since we have seen the same theme and conflicts in several movies in the past, Bhoomi never excites you, in the first place. With several cinematic exaggerations, the sensitivity of farmers’ problems only gets diluted. 

At many places, you get a feeling of listening to WhatsApp forward messages as dialogues. The film lacks a punch and doesn’t touch any high points throughout. The staging looks artificial and lacks emotions. Despite seeing some hard-hitting visuals, the impact is not felt because of the staging and execution. Director Lakshman could have taken more time to give a new perspective to the farmers' problems. The cat and mouse game between the protagonist and antagonist lacks engagement.

Though the climax game between the two looks interesting, it is, unfortunately, unrealistic and logic goes for a toss here. The intent is very much seen and appreciable, but there is nothing much fresh or new to talk about. Maybe, with better packaging, Bhoomi could’ve appealed better.

Jayam Ravi has stayed true to his character and he emotes well in the serious scenes. He also allows the story to take the centre-stage, which is good. In a film that runs for 125 minutes, the female lead Nidhhi Agerwal would’ve appeared for around 10 - 15 minutes in total. Even if you remove her character from the movie, the impact would’ve been the same, without any change. Radha Ravi gets a templated character and he does a fair job. Quality actors like Thambi Ramaiah and Saranya Ponvannan could have been utilized better. The villain of the film - Ronit Roy, is a cliche villain who is predictable and flat. 

D Imman’s background score lends support (except for the villain theme) and is probably one of the good aspects of the movie. Dudley’s visuals and Ruben’s editing are functional.