Crime thrillers always have a good scope in Tamil cinema and if it is utilized well with an intriguing story and an engaging screenplay, the film's success is assured. Kaalidas starring Bharath and Ann Sheetal is one such film that has got the potential to win big among the audience.

A series of deaths happen in an area and all the deaths happen in a similar way; the victims fall from the top of the terrace. Kaalidas (Bharath), an honest cop and his higher official (Suresh Menon) set out on the investigation to track down the mystery behind these deaths. Meanwhile, Vidya (Ann Sheetal), Kaalidas' wife feels bad that he doesn't spend time with her at all and is always into investigation, crimes, and job pressures. What was the duo's (Kaalidas and his boss) finding and how does it change the life of Kaalidas forms the rest of the plot. Ofcourse, there are subplots involving Aadhav Kannadasan and Ann Sheetal that are neatly connected to the main premise.

First things first, Kaalidas is definitely a solid comeback for Bharath and he can feel proud about doing this film. He is outstanding as Inspector Kaalidas and his physique and body language completely supplements the character. Despite being the hero, he paves the way for the script to take the driver's seat and he adapts to it, rather than becoming a larger than life character. He plays one of the lead characters that takes the story forward.

Suresh Menon gets a meaty role and fortunately a very memorable one in his acting career. He fits the bill and delivers a completely justifying performance. Ann Sheetal, who impressed everyone with her impactful performance in Ishq (Malayalam) is brilliant. She has managed to pull off the character with conviction. The character has the scope for various emotions and Ann Sheetal aces it well. Aadhav Kannadasan is put to good use and it is nice to witness the potential actor inside him coming out. These four lead characters keep the film upright.

Debut Director Sri Senthil highly impresses with his intact writing and neat execution. Right from the word go, the film never deviates from its core plot and even the songs (which you might initially think is a waste of time) have something to establish. The writing should be given its due credit because until the very last moment, the guessing game continues. The team has made an extensive research on the intricacies of police investigations and it is evident through the visuals. The dialogues need a special mention and it makes sense at many places. The twists definitely give an impact and it doesn't feel out of place. Similarly, the execution has also been quite effective as there is no major loss in the transfer of words to visuals. Sri Senthil makes a loud debut with a promising product and he is here to stay.

The screenplay is engaging throughout and the predictability percentage is zero which is actually the best part of the film. The second half, especially has a very gripping screenplay and it keeps you hooked to your seats. The film holds a very strong message in the end, but it hasn't been evidently shown on screen or been preached and that also works in favour. Kaalidas is an investigative cop thriller, but not even a single fight sequence take place and the film still manages to keep you engaged.

On the flip side, the climax reveal might not be clearly understood by a section of audience and there are chances of them getting confused. A few cinematic liberties have been taken to keep the story engaging and get a conclusion.

On the technical side, Vishal Chandrasekar's background music is at times loud, but, in an overall picture, acts as a major support system for the film. Suresh Bala's cinematography is wonderful and the visuals keep you arrested right from the first aerial shot. The visuals supplement the director's vision rightly. Editor Bhuvan Srinivasan should get due credit for his crisp and taut editing and delivering an engaging crime thriller. He is also one of the reasons behind maintaining the suspense until the climax.

In a nutshell, Kaalidas is a film that deserves a watch for its fairly engaging screenplay and smart writing with some neat performances.